Want to ask a question? Click here

What are the costs associated with WAVE Transit and where does it get its money?

Adam Wagner
StarNews
A WAVE transportation bus travels along Carolina Beach Road in 2011. StarNews file photo.

A WAVE transportation bus travels along Carolina Beach Road in 2011. StarNews file photo.

NOTE: This question was originally submitted and answered in 2010 by Pat Gannon. In January 2013, Adam Wagner provided this updated answer:

Wave Transit’s operating budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013, is $7.96 million. Since the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010, the budget has risen by about $700,000.

Several different sources fund Wave, including local governments, passenger fares and state and national transportation agencies. Passenger fares total $993,000, or about 12% of the funding, according to Wave’s budget.

The Federal Transit Administration is paying about $3.09 million, or about 38.8 percent of the budget. That’s up from about 33 percent in 2010-11.

The N.C. Department of Transportation is paying about $1 million. New Hanover County and agencies such as its Department of Aging and Department of Social Services pay $723,425 for Wave.  The City of Wilmington contributes $1.285 million. UNCW pays $745,000 for the Seahawk Shuttle, while Brunswick County and the town of Leland are paying $91,875 for the Brunswick Connector.

Expected costs for FY 2014, according to Wave’s budget, include:

Wages: $3,541,552

Fringe benefits: $1,203,566

Fuel: $1,101,100

Insurance: $589,947

Vehicle maintenance: $529,742

Professional services: $459,600

Tires and tubes: $150,000

Utilities: $94,700

Services: $78,800

Marketing and publishing: $43,400

Office supplies: $35,800

Shop supplies: $12,000

Taxis and licenses: $2,500

Other: $123,111

User-contributed question by:
Steve Mullen

Got a comment about this post or know more about the answer? Click here to let us know!


Bookmark and Share

2 Responses to “ What are the costs associated with WAVE Transit and where does it get its money?”

  1. On March 3, 2011 at 4:39 pm ryan wrote:

    $7.3 million!!?? You have to be kidding? Why don’t you just say, “Tax payers foot 95% of the bill”…with the exception of UNCW, all those other sources are from taxpayers! How is it that “fringe benefits” account for almost a million dollars!? At $7.3 million dollars, you could buy everybody that rides the bus a car!! This is absurd…
    This whole “evironmentally friendly” crap is just that…crap! So you save $300 a month in electricity and you paid how many hundreds of thousands to be environmentally friendly… you’ll never make that back! It’s a BUS STATION!! A $4.5 million BUS STATION!!

  2. On May 28, 2011 at 2:13 pm Bob Smith wrote:

    Thanks for this information. The WAVE Transit looks like a government jobs program–with 65 percent of the budget going for salaries and benefits.

    Just how many employees receive that compensation?

    Also, how can we determine actual individual ridership. WAVE claims, I believe, are inflated. Do they count every time somebody gets on a bus? Isn’t it likely that the same people ride regularly and frequently?

    I’ve read the Cape Fear Public Transportation Authority “Service Expansion and Long Range Financial Plan,” May 2011. A pie-chart on page 5 shows “charges for Services”: 33.54 percent making up operating revenues. How does that square with your report of 10 percent?

    Thanks



X
Ask a question
X

Ask a question

If you’re looking for answers about living in coastal North Carolina, you’ve come to the right place. If we don’t have the answer to your question, we’ll find out or try to find someone who does. Hey, that’s our job! So, ask your question below and we’ll do our best to find the answer. Once we do, we’ll post it in an appropriate category.





Can we use your name to credit you by name (no e-mail or other contact information) with this question when we post an answer?
Yes
Your question:

Post a comment
X

Talk to us!

Have a comment about this post or know more about the answer? Use this form to let us know. Note that all comments are moderated and must be approved before they are posted, although you may see your own comments the first time you post them.





Your comment: